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CSPAN
Nov 11, 2013 7:00am EST
. besides her natural resource and we have more than we thought, we have self-government. if we don't have that, what do we have? i also think the wonder of it was in the late 18th century when general washington would be the british empire and a french immigrant were riding horseback upon what was then called jane conceal. they were looking down over this suave and they were imagining this national capital. like who are these guys to think that they can do this? philadelphia, the second largest in the persian empire, we have to have this great empire. they were imagining the executive mansion and the capital of upper on the postal. they put all this together anything how much imagination and courage did that take? imaginimagine how much it's a de about a country that govern itself, which had never been done it so. imagine all the issues which were very much alive than. they said no, we can deal with this. we can make it work if we are congress and the presidency and checks and balances, we can make it work. even with everybody screaming at each other. thathat's what we have today. is not
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2013 11:00am EST
about the fact this is an epidemic or portion. that's the thing we don't focus on. we focus on the alcoholics are the drunk driver. we don't look at the common person's behavior. for women, it's only nine drinks a week in terms of low restricting guidelines. that's not a lot and never more than one or two occasions. taking nights off from drinking and a lot of people would find that something that couldn't manage. >> host: what about young girls. do they fall in the same range as that? i know we look at the age different is in young women and say women our age. you know, finding the difficulty. are there differences amongst the age of women in general? guest of the young generation of women has been targeted by the alcohol industry. in the mid-1990s, we saw the invention of both sleep.cut in fees prepackaged drinks that are basically starter drinks, cocktails with training wheels on a transitional drinks that people into drinking. move them away from you because that women usually don't like the taste of. what happens is they mature into vodka drinkers. so on campuses, you'v
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 4:05pm EST
think that it's always on the move, and our -- i don't know how much energy to spend on being offended by my lee cyrus thinking she's black. like, i don't know. [laughter] >> right. >> i absolutely agree. one of the things that drove me crazy. i didn't watch it, i don't care. i was sick of hearing about my lee cyrus. we have so much to do, stop wasting energy on this girl, what she's doing. i think that, you know, the cultural appropriation question is one that bothers us, absolutely, that cultures are, you know, they are borderless. i mean, we live right next to each other, always cultures informing and influencing each other, and you're right is that there's so much new produced that one of the things that black culture does is it is constantly on guard, constantly creating and recreating something new. you mentioned justin bieber and robin thicke, is it, you know, and this is what you can tell young people is it's tired. it's, you know, we listen to it and say that sounds like robin gaye, r and b30 years ago, so it's right that there is a constant mobility in moving in the
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 11:15am EST
. >> i saw him in my acknowledgment. he's part of my circle so he only e-mails when he's telling me, don't print this, i'm on, and then i know it will be -- >> goodbye. >> hello. where do you work? >> i actually worked on the hi hill. >> for whom? >> the house oversight committee. >> you guys have a lot to oversee. would you tell them, why don't the issue a legal subpoena? they don't think it will be unforced? >> i don't really know how to decide. >> just requesting that somebody can come, a legal subpoena that has to be enforced by the sheriff. >> nice to meet you. >> i've been trying to see every time you come to an event. >> well, i don't do it that often. for a book and for cpac, that's about it. you have to come next year. >> thank you very much. >> hello. i like your tie. [inaudible] >> thank you. i know. these right wingers are driving me crazy. thank you. hey, good to see you again. i've heard you are my groupie. you have to tell me your name again. [inaudible] >> let's see. [inaudible conversations] spin where do you live? here in new york? >> [inaudible] >> okay, good to see yo
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 6:00pm EST
don't want to talk about kennedy anymore. people are so eager. i can't imagine any other president about whom there is that sort of feeling. >> we have a few more weeks. i want to play it out and we do have a wonderful event here a few weeks ago sponsored by the open university of kennedy -- what kennedy and lincoln's second term would it look like and you asked would he have persuaded to ask congress to pass legislation involving civil rights? on that count would he have achieved what johnson achieved? >> i don't think he would have had the great society energy and commitment that johnson had because kennedy was essentially a foreign-policy president. that is to say politics can unseat you but foreign politics can kill you. he would have run against barry goldwater and would have won it did victory the way johnson did. he would have carried big democratic majorities into the house and senate with him and i think he would have gotten the big tax cut, the federal aid to education, the medicare and the civil rights bills passed. that would have put him in the lead with the most progr
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 1:30pm EDT
it is less likely we will need those judges so if you don't mind, if you don't mind i would ask if the educator's here would stand so the we may honor you properly for the bush -- the work that you do. [applause] >> and to be sure you are properly recognized, the head of my children's school is here with two of her colleagues. i don't know why you are hiding but we are glad you are here so that being said welcome to you both, we are happy to see you and you are heavily happy to be seen. i cannot forget it was year ago this week, a year ago this week that these terrible events occurred. it seems like a long time ago. doesn't it? >> i don't feel something has happened to me. when i think of malala yousafzai, there are pictures, and everything, i don't think that is me because i am feeling it. i am just a normal girl, and i am feeling powerful because after that incident, the people and the good wishes of people that people have sent me, in their prayers that have made me more powerful so i am really happy now and i don't feel like i was shot. >> one of the things i've learned from
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 9:05pm EST
and describing rockwell paintings and i don't think that people really took the time to realize what an original he was. but i think in many ways it goes beyond the in many cases so much more. >> [inaudible] [applause] >>> up next on book tv, after words with debbie hines creator of legal speaks blog. this week, abbe contributing authors to how can you represent those people, the director and supervisor of georgetown law school criminal defense and prisoner advocacy clinic discuss the defense attorneys answers to the professional question the year asked most often how they are able to defend those that commit the worst crimes. the program is about an hour. >> i am so glad to be doubled to interview you on your book how can you represent those people. it was a very interesting and thought-provoking book and i don't say that lightly because if it weren't i wouldn't say otherwise but it was definitely a lot of emotion and ander and sadness and laughter. it basically ran the whole gamut. why don't you start by telling us how you came up with the book. >> we are delighted with the above response. the
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 7:00am EST
or maim another human being? i don't understand where the disconnect is in terms of federal or state system. >> i think it gets down to the difference between rage on the one hand and lopez on the other which this court held as a rational way to regulate commerce to prohibit certain items. >> there is no dispute that these chemicals were transported along interstate lines. that is not even disputed. >> i don't finger was disputed in lopez, the firearm would have to cross state lines the the problem in lopez was the federal statute was not structured in a way that had a jurisdictional nexus that made the statute applicable as a regulation. >> this case to decide the commerce clause question. the government didn't even a search it. they assert it now but as we took the case the issue was whether the treaty supported the laws. >> that is right, just as scalia and the government like a private party can wave a constitutional argument but on the other hand i would say we are not particularly concerned about the commerce clause argument because it has the same basic defect as the treaty po
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2013 8:00pm EST
that don't have a high value. what we did was initiate reform. those were a part of it. and the biggest in the state were most of the school districts had to buy from one company. by pulling back on collective gardening, school districts can bid on health insurance and districts are saving tens of millions. and other changes beyond the fiscal leave are happening. at the federal level, it was more than half of the budget; aid to local government. so anything we did to balance the budget, besides massive cuts, required reforms in those area and same thing at the national level. and those areas you have to in act reform and many of them don't happen to current beneficiaries. we made the changes to current ones and balancing the budget and you make a convincing argument there are schools and governments better today than they were in the past. >> your co-author said at aei your moderate in temper, but not in policy. and you write moving to the center, doesn't mean you have to move to the center. how do you think you will fair with right-to-life positions, which are a good deal more st n st
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 6:45am EST
discriminating against people of color. that's what they say. but what do you do if folks don't believe it? suppose you have a faculty, let's say, a faculty at some institution. and the faculty says we don't discriminate against people of color. but the faculty is, nonetheless, all white. well, you know, i mean, people know that for a long time there is institutions have engaged in racial discrimination. onlookers say, why should we believe you now? you say you're not engaged in racial discrimination, but what we see is a faculty that is all white. we want more than that. we want more than your word that you're not engaged in racial discrimination. you may be lying, or frankly, you may be practicing racial discrimination and not even know it. you may be engaged, you know, you may be engaged, you may be deluding yourself. you don't even know your engaged in racial discrimination but you are. and so to show us that you're not we want some live bodies up there. that's the only way that we will believe that you are no longer engaged in racial discrimination. let me give you one of the rational
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 10:00pm EST
i am skeptical because i've never seen entitlement taken away. he made that argument so i don't know if you are familiar with him but i thought you might have an opinion. >> actually i concur with him. entitlement to be taken away has to be instituted and it has to have some success in being implanted. this could be a very rocky entrance and a bomb-making or may not survive. it's not definitive and it's more likely than not that it will collapse of its own weight. that has been what i was advocating during the shutdown. i thought tactically it was a mistake. there was no reason to call for the overthrow of obamacare by legislation when there is not a chance in hell that you could do that under our system. you really can't undo a law from one house of congress. there is no way it was going to be undone and we were heading into october the first when the shutdown began. it was also the day when obamacare this brand-new web site was going to revolutionize their health care signed up exactly six people. i mean, that isn't even enough to field a baseball team. there would be no outfield.
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 8:00pm EST
is what is the best story? >> i don't know about that. now, i don't think i got the good ones in there. sorry to be a good question. anyone else? >> is there a follow-up? [inaudible] no, but it was fun to be a part of kansas and i heard earlier we talked about preserving the voices of elders and that is important and i was so happy that i got to do that. it's your history. it's part of what you grew up with. it was an honor to do. [applause] >> thank you. >> now wan book tv deborah solomon recounts the life of norman rockwell known for his portraits and "saturday evening post." she examines his professional life and personal life which were marked by bouts of depression. the talk on the norman rockwell museum in stockbridge massachusetts is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for that fabulously gracious introduction and i'm glad. i can't believe that the archive has been digitized now that i'm done. i wore gloves fy read through the papers but it's hard to turn pages. i'm glad to know that other people can now do it in ten minutes. i came to this book from the historical background
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2013 9:50am EST
venter's coming back, don't be too shocked. [laughter] but obviously even quote simple single eukaryotic cells have a lot more levels of regulation. but one thing you should be cognizant of is epigenetic phenomenon are still based on genetics. everything in the sale is coded for initially i the dna. the properties of the proteins and processes get their own specifications from that, and as a sales get more complex, those processes get more complex. there's an effort now, a european effort, to try to make the entire genome in a massive effort sort of like the public genome effort over the next five years to remake east, replacing all of the other chromosomes one at a time, but because everything evolves from the genetic code as soon as it gets read, the sale remakes everything that it is going to need. yeast and your carry-on going to be proper more simplistic. >> is protein decay similar to atomic decay? and does the rate of decay for certain proteins affect the use within the cell? >> it's similar in the sense that different proteins to have their own half-lives, determined largely by t
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2013 1:15pm EST
to mayor of las vegas. how did you become known as a mob lawyer? >> you don't start off as a mob lawyer. there's been authors who suggested i was sent out by mobsters to represent bob interest in las vegas. they did not have any particular casino here to take a little piece of it. i came out here with the expectation of not even practicing criminal law. i went into the das office of the clerk while doing similar work. i one day a fellow came for bankruptcy. i take care of him. we had met him. he was a car dealer in those days it was friendlier and the sense the sense you could talk to a car dealer not concern yourself with a suggestion that perhaps are taken out of the house, that kind of thing. one day he calls and says he'd like a bankruptcy. come on down. i had an office over a flower shop in the roses that wafted through the floor. it was very romantic. i think a church in $250. he was happy. i was happy. a couple weeks later, a phone call comes into the pit of the hotel where he was dealing the cards. the person on the end of the phone said, who is the best criminal lawyer las vega
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 8:45am EST
the imposters of pretended patriotism. ben frankly warned us about sacrifice. i don't know if i read that in your book? >> those that would sacrifice freedom deserve none or something to that effect. >> yeah, for security. >> right. >> neither. and it's, you know, i just did an article today on they discovered, it was a very good article, i thought, in "the new york times" that the voluntary leaks of the government on august 2nd about the conversation between al-qaeda and the head of yemen was actually did more harm to national security than all of the pape ors -- you all saw that -- released by snowden, for example. but it's, again, an example of the cynical use of national security. that if the government does it, it's legitimate. and the fact is that most of the classified information shouldn't be classified, but it's routinely leaked as was the story about the success of that electronic surveillance because hay wanted to -- they wanted to show that what nsa does is necessary. so it was actually shut down, the communication. you know, the government, if they leak, it's legitimate.
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 11:00pm EST
can't be the leader of it? >> i don't think it -- i don't think an independent candidate can possibly win a three-way race. if you think about it. you run a three-way race and translate to a morality of the electorial college vote. get to the house where each state gets one vote and republicans have 30 odd delegations. it's a virtual yule impossibility for the presidency. what i wish that americans elect would do is say instead of trying to get candidates to run or path and run for a job that is impossible for them to win is encourage independent candidates. people who are ceo or university presidents, community leaders to run as independents for the house and for the senate. >> yeah. >> there is nothing wrong with the senate that three or four legitimately independent senators could fix. it could go a long way. there's a structure barrier on the presidential side. there simply can't be -- >> you agree. >> that was sort of -- trying to finish my thought. that's what i'm shocked at. what where the 2014 candidates? it would be so easy -- i look at my home state of florida and w
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2013 12:00am EST
offenses makes them more dangerous. we isolate, marginalized, we don't let them reintegrate so they become more dangerous that is a smart thing to share but he has a personal place how you could represent people who do hideous things. >> host: i wanted to explain that more because just the compilation of people is so interesting to read their perspective be cozened my pointed you gave for not doing the same type of representation and we will talk about the issues but the problems of this system that they are all the same. teeeighteen tell us about your background and how you came to represent your clients. >> guest: i am so pleased that abbe smith included me in the book but i was inspired by my grandfather's legacy as a civil rights advocate came of age in the '60s in mississippi with the naacp and voters league and they were -- he was targeted before i was born and then i went to law school i started to look into lew the law and wanted to practice working on a class-action peace that was my first real exposure to the criminal-justice system and i saw a lot of parallels pacific cisco is l
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 1:35pm EST
mom's death, which i can remember the title of. i don't know. of course. tsa. is that what is? i love that as a. the way that he -- you know, and i have read it over and over again. the way that he so elegantly talks about the personal and communal, and the larger issues about craze in america so beautifully done, it's amazing to me ever to marry it. and hoping that one day i can, you know, be on his level. he is fantastic. i was the game but his work a lot when i was turning this. >> what i was reading your book right about the time of the martin trial, jurors zimmerman. and it struck me as sort of the back story for what had happened i don't know if you have anything you would like to say about that. >> when i read it -- because i could not follow the trial on television. i could not. another thing to have the patients for it. i was so driven, i just could not watch it. i felt like i can't take it anymore. reading books. i don't have to be surprised. i could not in the launching a trial on television. and so i was following the trial in some ways on twitter. when i found in the firs
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 3:50pm EST
'm speaking tonight. they don't have any complicated captions, so you don't have to worry about having to read them. but it's just so that we can see that we're talking about people and kind of get what i call the reality check. so, let's see, i have to kind of do it like this because i have to keep track. i'm going to start by telling you a story about something that happened in los angeles a few years ago. a group of health activists set up a kind of sidewalk clinic for day laborers, to test day laborers for hiv. and so a young man, omar sierra, was on the street corner that day, and he went to the clinic and sat down in the chair, and the nurse who was at the clinic, she tied him off and inserted the needle to draw his blood, and all of a sudden everybody saw these border patrol agents coming across the street. and so, of course, everybody ran. and omar, he tore off the tourniquet, and he pulled out the needle, and he got up, and he ran just like everybody else. and omar, he was lucky because he got away that a day. but a lot of his friends didn't. and so he went home, and he was very upset
CSPAN
Nov 14, 2013 11:00pm EST
experience. if our biggest problem is that enough people who don't have ?urnses aren't signing up quick enough for insurance, that's a problem that i will accept because it's a problem we can fix. if all we talk about here here is the pace, where people go from uninsured to insured, and we can fix that because we know the product is good. senator boxer talked about the massachusetts experience in which during the first month of their enrollment for the massachusetts exchange, only .3 #% of the total signed up during that month. why? because people take time. this is not animal easy decision to sign up for health care. in connecticut where we have an exchang that's up and running, a wbsz thabs working, the first month, know our number? it was not.# # #%, but enrolled 10% of the expected total in the first 30 days, and here's what people say about their experience with connecticut's exchange. one said, this is a great resource for cops residents to apply for health coverage, thanks to the health care law. another said, i chose access health because i've been denied in the past by other ca
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 11:50am EST
. joyce carol oates is the author. ms. oates, we don't often have novelists on booktv on c-span, but this is historical fiction in a sense, isn't it? >> oh, yes. >> how so? >> well, i did a tremendous amount of research, and that was the most pleasant part of the writing into princeton and vicinity in the years 1905 or '6 when woodrow wilson was president of princeton university. >> host: what was princeton like at that time? >> guest: well, princeton at that time, it's a kind offal goer call representation of affluent white, christian america in general and princeton is sort of an exemplary community. and woodrow wilson has a cameo in your book, doesn't he? >> guest: well, woodrow wilson is a principal character, he's in much of the novel, and in a sense, it's about wood wilson. he's confronted by a demon. he's tempted and -- well, i shouldn't say what happens, but he behaves quite nobly in the novel. but he does represent many of the shortcomings of people of his time such as he was a racist, and he was a sexist and other -- probably his most principal problem was that he
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2013 4:00pm EST
justice. if we don't adopt this bill, we won't require -- these are in the bill. these protections are -- just let me finish this paragraph, then i would be happy to. we won't require commanders to immediately refer all allegations of sexual assault to professional criminal investigators. we won't restrict the authority of senior officers to modify the findings and sentence of court-martial convictions. we won't require higher level review of any decision not to prosecute allegations of sexual assault. i would be happy to yield. i will put the balance of my statement in the record. the presiding officer: all time has expired. mr. inhofe: i have a parliamentary inquiry. we were to be given equal time for the last ten minutes. i had three minutes and all i want to do is ask a question. am i -- mr. levin: i ask unanimous consent that that be allowed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. inhofe: everything that my chairman has said i agree with. he's making my speech for me. it's critical that we get the bill. all i'm saying is i made the statement yesterday, that republicans
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2013 11:00pm EST
be delusional, but they are not stupid. they understand that you don't telegraph your agendas because that turns people off. when i was young, stalin was alive, the slogan of the american communism party was -- it was not solve yet america dictatorship, take away the wealth, and distribute it to our friends. their slogan was peace, jobs, and democracy. there is a guru of the left sames saul, people are familiar with him by now, who said. there's one message of the book which is don't telegraph were agendas, lies. that is if you want to introduce a comprehensive state-run health care system otherwise known -- that's communism -- what you do is, first of all, you call it single payer, as though that's a benign thing. it's not benign if the state controls everybody's access to health care can decide what kind of health care you can get, what you can't, and knows all your financial and health information. that's a totalitarian state right there. second, don't sell it as a totalitarian system, but that you're going to insure the uninsured. you are familiar with the fact that obamacare is not going to
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 7:30am EST
, and they may be right, they may be wrong but i would say that i don't trust any experts. and that's just my professional constitution. i'm hopeful often that once i do the research myself, and once i go to try to back it up, that i can demonstrate that that person was right. but i never take anyone's word, intel of done my own reporting. >> -- until i've done my own reporting. >> i just wanted to say, i spent an entire night last week reading nina's book cover to cover completely mesmerized. and it's hard to mesmerized at that level, especially given the way and and my background. >> who are you? >> my name is -- i have spent a great amount of my life so far on these issues, and when i started reading nina's book i was very effort. my heart was pounding because i could tell how fair she was trying to be and i was like, is jeffrey sachs going to get away with this? to me it's not a matter of jeffrey sachs. it's beyond him. it's an entire thinking class of people who never ever would ever imagine in the minds but africans, just like anyone else, are no different than anyone else. the only way
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2013 7:00pm EST
this product. you don't know at the time whether it's fantastic or not until much later on when it comes out of those barrels and it's put into bottles and you have either a fabulous vintage or a -- vintage and that creates tremendous opportunities. will it be good? will it be not so good? what will prices be like? colon math .. there are some rich futures in the asian markets. we have hat shrimp markets here. they didn't do well. i think frozen shrimp was trade here in the '60s. i know that canned tuna has been proposed as a commodity. didn't do very well. as a rule canned products don't do well. canned tomato sauce was proposed and tried and didn't do very well, went away quickly. i suspect that someone tries to bring back canned tuna, same thing. however, considering the sustainability issues around fish, i think there certainly could be a market. i could see salmon futures for one, interesting particularly fertile ground. >> so we have a food and beverage lawyer. i didn't know there was such a subcategory of law. we're learning so much today. okay. i see one more question there go ahead.
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2013 10:00am EST
society. so the gillibrand amendment, of course, is we don't trust those commanders. when we trust these young people with their lives. we ask them to have the ultimate responsibility which is that of defending this nation, but we don't trust them to prosecute, to do their job, to do their duties. .. i've had with the men and women who are in command and the senior petty officers, the master chief petty officers and the master sergeants that are responsible for the good order and discipline of our men and women in our armed forces. so i won't go into the fact that this gillibrand amendment includes things like burglary and house breaking and perjury and robbery and forgery. it's been expanded beyond belief in its areas that have to be referred out of the chain of command. i won't even bother with that. awon't even bother with that. out of the chain of command. i won't even bother without. what im am saying, and i say as passionately as i came to my colleagues, that if we do not trust the commanding officers who take our young men and women into battle, our most precious asset, if w
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2013 6:00am EST
and work together. we don't need to go through 43 different attempts to repeal or deny people the access to health care. the affordable care act is a bill that was passed by both houses, sieb signed by the president and upheld by the supreme court. as problems arise, we should sit down and commit to work together. but republicans have to agree on the basic premises that health care is a right, not a privilege. >> other other issue: energy independence. what did you propose that is different? >> we have to wean off fossil fuels. investing in alternate energy resources while engaging in an all of the above strategy. we are getting to the point where we are exporting natural gas. but we have to have the all above strategy. not drill baby drill. >> who is the next generation of leaders in congress? would you like to be speaker of the house? >> i am focused on what is in front of me and that is doing the best i can for the 23ered congressional district. >> who is the next generation of leaders in the house? on both sides. >> there are a number of members on both sides of the aisle that are b
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2013 11:00pm EST
you, it's going to turn around. don't think about it in a nuclear sense, but think strategic first, coming from great distance or no distance, to solve a problem. last, think about the conventional forces and moving and huge costs of standing armies and moving them to the problem. it's just the reality we have to deal with, and how we're going to do that, how are we going to afford it, those are the the questions, i think, that we're going to, as an alliance, come to grips with and understand how to do that; ours, we're not matching resources and capabilities with the security that we desire to have. >> thank you. >> other than that i'm in a good place. >> that leaves a good place. the leading expert brings a dose of reality, make it a concern, particularly such with europe. when you hear those speakers, particularly john cartwright's point about, you know, we have to be ability to exercise and leverage increasing speed and deploy our forces. do you see this happening in nato? is nato leveraging deemployability of the forces to provide adequate deterrent against threats from both n
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2013 1:00am EDT
to the fact that people cannot get information. >> i don't believe that his for a minute. let me defend a journalism. i know the good old days were so good. with the reversal of glass-steagall or also was cited by a clinton futures that was the derivatives market they all happened in the ladies the media did not cover it in any way "the new york times" or the "l.a. times" the "washington post" was a church leaders of the regulation was lousy war after another the basically collapsed upon i of the guinier times "l.a. times" are "washington post" where reporting on weapons of mass destruction and see you could court -- clarify the old days of journalism had mccarthyism, segregation, we had lots of problems. it is true that old model of journalism that had some valuable thing is in its sending reporters around the world to cover the dues to pay a journalist is not something i appreciate we have laws that model the region have positive things in their place and as long as the internet is not shut down one reason i am concerned about privacy is i want people to trust online communication or
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 4:45am EST
screw around with the power of the president? i don't think u.s. steel or any other companies want internal rev enough agents checking expense accounts. want government to go back to he tell bills to fine out who was with you? these are real quotes. now, if the kens were prepared to do this to stop a steel price hike, what they do to keep the presidency in their hands? some of you know i worked for robert kennedy. no public figure i admired more. but this this dark side. they get away with it but people know that something is up. one of those underground things that know. it's all kind of underground. last, 1968. what happens? so here are two notions. if there's no war in vietnam, then richard nixon's most powerful argument for the presidency -- i know the world, i know the soviet union, i can bring peace to vietnam -- is irrelevant, and the republicans can find somebody who could actually win elections, say the governorship of california by a million votes. reagan made a very lame last minute bid for the nomination. take away the vietnam war, nixon's strong point, and i realize t
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2013 12:30am EST
of the legal advisers because their work for the court is absolutely crucial. i don't think it's well understood by anybody outside the court and the role they play is extremely important, and i hope that, perhaps, to have a humanist talk about them and their role and where it fits in everything, so one time thing, jim eluded to this, but it's my view that we should all keep in mind when talking about foreign intelligence collection, foreign -- the function of the agencies charged with that responsibility, and then the activity of the judiciary, a limited activity under the foreign intelligence surveillance act, that if you look at article ii, and, of course, that's the article and constitution that establishes the office of the president and gives the president his responsibilities and authority, you don't find the word "judge" in there at all. now, this is a very unique circumstance where the third branch actually plays a role in overseeing the activities of the executive in app area in which the executive constitutionally has exclusive responsibility, the conduct of our foreign aff
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 11:40am EST
of the system if they don't owe how those swing in seven impressive to should not even approach it is already decided, you have a great shot and it note hill left thousand payback 32 years later where do you kept -- get this system the that is so set to throw away the leadership. >> they signed a release if everybody had to stand alan that is the key. there has to be an awful place heim field making field -- became prime gold was struck down so both sides and add to do it one unless level to raise money in the house of representative the majority have leadership pacs but another avenue to give money to candidates in you can as an individual. and also to raise this money for the leadership pac he does it is expected. >> host: review want to be a power broker. >> it takes so much to a m. if it is the destruction likely members were paid for speeches solo will schedule would revolve room to they can give speeches on mondays hit did have an impact to bandies because no more people that was a limitless level of raising money because that is a huge time consuming effort not to mention a distraction
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 1:00pm EST
whole career from drug dealer to corporate rock star is a story of don't simply hold down a job and finish school because that is a sucker's game. the way you make it is the way the mafia lords make it, which is to be tough and want to win and winning is its own justification. so the north carolina boy clutching a bible is a man named dean tries who is the son of a fire and brimstone teacher in north carolina and his family farmed tobacco for generations and he grew up with the ambition to be an entrepreneur and his heroes were people like andrew carnegie and henry ford and they were older americans and he has a deep-rooted myths in our history, which is very evident when you travel to the piedmont region of the carolinas. but he traded a chain of truck stops between north carolina and virginia with fast food restaurants and all the while, the countryside was collapsing around him. wal-mart and multinational companies were making it impossible for him to compete and meanwhile tobacco was dying as an industry and so was textiles from the other mainstay of life. by the time he tri
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 12:00pm EST
what happened on that mtv stage which is why i don't watch it. >> at the same time i would hazard to guess that it's by the lack of real culture that is in their heads all the time. so it is something to think about. so in your own efforts to share your knowledge and experience and love is a culture is an important thing. and i think that creating those moments is super important. if it is just your little cousin. there's an incredible archive of everything that has been created and that is also amazing. >> i find it that so many of them find stuff that i didn't even know about. so i think the work that you do one-on-one and what we all have to do is important and young creative minds are absorbing it all and unlike the kind of commercial sort of regurgitation of something that has already happened, they are going to process it if they have access to it an interesting and exciting ways. thank you so much. [applause] >> please join me again in thinking farah griffin and sharifa rhodes-pitts for this conversation. i want to remind you of their books are on sale at the gift shop and
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 10:45am EDT
peace and legitimation. can you recall a lot of younger people -- a lot of people now don't recall, but just looking out into the crowd, some of you will recall the late 1960s and early 1970s. some of you will recall the long and hot summer. some of you will recall the soldiers and the army alert called out to patrol the streets of the united states in the late 1960s. and it was not a matter of whether there would be a riot were several riots but how many riots were there and remember that in the late 1960s and the early 1970s, social disruption, violent social disruption, it just went up in flames and there were hundreds of people who were killed on the streets of the united states. kilter social disruption and there were many people who thought, this is really a dangerous situation and we need to do something to calm things down and we need to do something to show people who were saying that we are going to have social justice or we will burn it down. well, what do you say to those people? you need to show them that we have had a change in regime and we really are going to repudi
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2013 10:00am EST
than directed against the homeland. that is not to say that we still don't face a threat, and it's certainly not to say that home grown violent extremists are inconsequential. far from it. >> i've always tell that our strongest -- felt that our strongest line of defense against these threats really is a strong intelligence-gathering capability. to what extempt has, you know, the nsa disclosures, how extensive is has the harm been in terms of those intelligence-gathering capabilities? director olsen? >> i would echo the comments recently of director clapper who characterized them as extremely damaging. there's no doubt that those disclosures have made our job harder. we've seen that terrorists, our adversaries are seeking to learn about the ways that we collect intelligence and seeking to adapt ask change the -- and change the ways they communicate in order to avoid our surveillance. so it's made our job significantly harder. >> how cowe repair the damage of it? director comey? what does congress need to do? what do we need to resist, potentially? >> i agree with what matt said ab
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 4:00pm EST
are not proud of or don't like. you are always drawn to the thing that question invites you to say every one in the world hated us. so this is true. i've done things that have been universally hated but i have quietly loved. and they are always liked little limericks that you wrote for someone's birthday party that fell flat when you delivered them that you but you actually thought they were sort of sly and in genius. it's that kind of thing i feel most proud of. i am sure that by the time i am an old man i will look back on my efforts and hang my head. i'm sure that is inevitable as it is for all of us. sure, in the front row. >> you talked about the legacy in your talk and i was wondering how as a country we go about reconciling those that we may have angered the international community. >> that is a really good question. the question is if you create anger leaves a residue of anger and illegitimacy how do you go about correcting that. i tell a story in my book -- i'm finally mentioning my book at one hour and 15 minutes into this book talk. [laughter] a toy story in davidand goliath about
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 2:00am EDT
be a consequence or -- the point that i'm getting at is a mandated, this is going to happen if you don't self-report. and mr. contractor, we don't know this. it's your job to help us enforce. it is your job to report back to us, and if you don't, black mark on you. you won't be a government contractor very long. and so that's -- that's the level at which i have passion for this issue, that we should not be letting -- when we give them the good housekeeping seal of approval, which is what this security clearance is, that ought to mean something. and if they breach it, that ought for something that we consider very serious with very serious consequences. and so i applaud your work. i would like to know how many have actually been discharged or disciplined for either lying on applications. obviously they wouldn't get the clearance. but not reporting after the fact. mr. chairman, again, thank you for the time. >> thanks. those were tough questions. senator mccaskill. >> i think one of the most revealing things this morning is the realization that while an arrest report may be part of a background
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2013 9:00am EST
. [laughter] >> i don't think it works for that. >> oh, okay. >> thank you very much for coming. >> yeah. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i think regardless where you are on the political spectrum, we are fortunate and grateful we live in the united states of america. it's a very unique place, and if america was considered to be a product, and we do try to sell our product overseas, what's our brand? i think our brand is a constitution, the rule of law, and our value system. under that brand and under that value system, there is that notion of equal under the eyes of the law, and i know that brand and value system is the ada, trying to balance the rights of americans with diabetics. >> this is a treaty. a treaty is a law. the emotional and political arguments in favor of the treaty, no one can disagree with these arguments, but the question is, will the treaty have the legal effect that's being proctored by the proponents of the treaty? we don't hear citations to the articles of the treaty. we don't hear consideration of the reports, the concluding obser
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2013 7:50am EST
? >> be a leader. he was annoyed by god. i don't think it's not uncommon for people to feel, politician and statesman. spin without giving away, can you tell us about the cursed? >> it really means the white upper class christian people who looked literally looked the other way when the ku klux klan was in new jersey and elsewhere. when black people were being lynched and harassed and tortured and murdered and the white leaders like woodrow wilson and many others just would not say anything about it. they wouldn't come out courageously to criticize it. they wouldn't do anything but it was basically community, see no evil, hear no evil and say no evil. so i thought there was a curse on the white race basically. >> and upton sinclair is in your book. >> upton sinclair was 26. he represents our younger generation. an interest in a quality among the races and sexes. that was also about women's race and women acquiring the vote. >> and jack london and grover cleveland. >> jack london is a friend of upton sinclair. they are both sources. >> where did future i just? >> my idea came because i c
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2013 9:00pm EST
or maim another human being, a chemical that could kill or maim a human being? i don't understand where the disconnect is in terms of our federal or state system. >> justice sotomayor i think it gets down to the difference between raache and lopez which this court is held as a classic and rational way to regulate commerce to basically prohibit certain items from congress. >> there is no dispute that these chemicals were transported along interstate lines. that's not even disputed in this case. >> i don't think it was disputed and lopez that the firearm would have had to cross-state lines but the problem and lopez was the federal statute was not sure it should in a way that had jurisdictional nexus that made the statute applicable. >> we could take this case to decide the commerce clause issue did it? it asserts it now but as we take the case the issue is whether the treaty supported the laws. >> that's right justice scalia and we think the government like a private party can weigh the constitutional argument. on the other hand i would say we are not particularly concerned about the comm
CSPAN
Nov 29, 2013 2:00pm EST
that they won. they didn't. we don't live in a capitalistic system we live in a corporate system. we don't live in a country that is fully socially conservative. we live in a country that is living on social issues. we understand that upheld at all that we have to fight and really centering on president obama as he is the bad guy. imagine her a moment that obama were impeached as so many conservatives seem to want. joe biden takes over. how is joe biden different than barack obama in any way even that he's less competent than the current president? joe biden has the same policy deceptions and sodas for the reclaimed him. so i think there is a broad movement that has to be fought. on the republican side, there are a lot of interesting candidates. an interesting guy, ron paul also i disagree with him strenuously on his foreign policy. allen west is an interesting night. his image matters. allen west is somebody that cuts an interesting figure for the republican party. there's other folks. mike pence of indiana. he's kind of laid low so far but i'm hoping he will throw his hat in the ring. one thi
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2013 10:00am EST
numbers of people. but, you know, i don't necessarily find huge comfort in that. and the solution, you know, anytime there's an imbalance in warfare, there's a major change. and so the solution if we need to be concerned about biological warfare at all -- and we can't ignore it -- is the same solution that we need for what's happening now with antibiotic-resistant organisms that are killing more people a year than car crashes are in the u.s. we need new antibiotics and new antiviral agents. and some major crash program, if we have a good repertory of those, we don't have to fare biological warfare. and emerging infections as the population keeps going up and denser is a far bigger threat to humanity than somebody deliberately making something, but it doesn't rule out that somebody wouldn't try. >> we have our final question for tonight. >> well, there's only two people left. we can get two questions. [laughter] >> [inaudible] >> oh, okay. all right? final question. >> the previous guy kind of stole my question, but i'll kind of -- >> well, let's go to the next guy then. [laughter] >> i
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
this together. in a baritone voice he would say if you can't say something good about someone, don't say anything. there was so much respect for this man but along with a philip randolph, who organized the brotherhood of sleeping car porters, represented the men working on the railroad. and when you come to washington and walked through the union station there is a bus. you have martin luther king jr. who was the president of the southern christian leadership conference born in atlanta georgia and then there was roy wilkins, the head of the naacp for the advancement of colored people that were born in minnesota, a wonderful man comed then there was whitney young who was born in kentucky, the dean of social work at atlanta university and later became the head of the national urban league. there was another man by the name of james farmer. farmer had attended the little wiley college in texas, why we texas. and he was part of the dating team -- debate team. they deviated harvard and they won. the graduate study at harvard university became very involved with the naacp and was later one of
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 6:00pm EST
phonet so you don't interrupt the inven . with that, let me get dirty. i am shannon o'neil. i work at the council on foreign relations very focused on next month america more broadly unedited and pleasure tonight at talking with two wonderful gentleman, who have written wonderful books are really impressive impressive books about mexico. the first one on my right is ricardo ainslie. his book is called "the fight to save juarez." this book tells the story of the border city, which many of you know i've had the unfortunate tension in recent years of being not only the most violent place in mexico, but by some accounts the most spineless in the world. he tells the story of this descent into darkness of this border city through the eyes and through the stories of many people in morris, the mayor from 20,722,010. it is a newspaper photographer who patrols the streets and shows up at the house and the grandstands. it is the mistress of a mid-level cartel operator. and finally a human rights activist that is thrown in to those trying to make sense of it and protects the people inside for
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2013 10:00pm EST
of the attention of the popular robert frost but we don't have that division in the same way you don't discover another rockwell matt, do you? >> you said in the war halted id think there were different rockwells for different people with sentimentality and makes me want to write another book i think his subjects were misunderstood during his lifetime he often painted people getting along the humanitarian side of america if you go look at the freedom of speech there will be a lot of years and eyes fragmentary because that painting is about looking and listening. why did i say that? because of the etf of community may be struck people in the '60s as sentimental but now at a time when the real from the government shut down and the pettiness of american politics we pnc that humanitarian ideals. i think he did like the idea of people coming together. he liked everyone to get along. look at the freedom of speech. that lincoln figure rising up he isn't wearing a wedding ring if he might be in integrity is new in town i know he is supposed to be greek or italian but uc the wedding ring their older and
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2013 12:00pm EST
over by a dumb looking blonde. >> host: do you editorialize in your book's? >> guest: no, i don't editorialize. i think every biographer and editorialize is in what you choose to put in. and, you know, every saint has a past and every sinner has a future. i really try and be, i try and show all sides. this is why i love biography, because you were telling the history of the time and you're trying to give a nuanced, complex picture which is what most people are. >> host: few women in history you right at that the power to stop the world simply by getting married. for five years the widow of john f. kennedy had been the house object of people's admiration and overwhelming gifts. >> guest: i wrote that in 1978. we're sitting here in 2013, and i would stand by that. >> host: did you like jackie kennedy on nasa's after you are finished? >> guest: yes. i think it to go into these books, if not liking her subject, respecting your subject. and i came out of that book with real respect for this woman. she was strong and she was a great mother. and she -- i didn't realize until years and
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2013 10:00am EST
about secrecy, i don't think you can draw from the fact that we want the program to continue the conclusion that the program should never have been secret. there are many intelligence programs that operate more effectively when they are not known because disclosure of what we obtain and how we obtain it can enable a hour adversaries to avoid or take steps to avoid what we are doing. that said, that doesn't mean that once they become disclosed, they are entirely ineffective. there is no question in my mind that this program is at least potentially less useful now than it would have been before the disclosure. whether it is actually less useful or not is going to take time to determine. but, you know, going forward obviously we have declassified and released the last two quarters of the fisa court and we are under the president's direction in a more forward leaning mode with respect to transparency. but we still come as a sort of custodian of the intelligence apparatus that protect the nation, we still have to be sensitive all the time to the fact that disclosures do risk compr
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 1:15am EST
everyone. a very boisterous crowd. everyone if i could call your attention to this side of the room. we don't usually get this kind of animated crowd for books about education. i am executive vice president of the new america foundation. if you haven't been yet this is new america nyc a place for storytelling and bringing policy stories alive and the think-tank of policy institute in washington called the new america foundation that works across of range of issues everything from health care to education foreign-policy technology policy and that's just the broadest rights. what we really are is an idea factory and a house and home for some of the most amazing talent out there. we are really lucky to have amanda with her book tonight. amanda is a fellow at the new america foundation one of the best examples that are moderator also is a former fellow of the new america foundation and both of you will be submitting your applications at the end of the night and we will look in the next fault this time for your fellowship of the new america foundation. you're in for a real treat. i want to hand
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